Schema upgrades should be reversible (also other transformations, actually)

Are you writing schema upgrade code? Then I humbly suggest you take the time to write schema downgrade code too.

“Why would I do that?” you might well ask, “I won’t ever need to downgrade.”

Now, I imagine you’re expecting me to say you actually will need to downgrade, but that isn’t what I’m saying.

Can you please get on with what you are actually saying?

Whevener you write code to transform something, be it a schema upgrade, some serialisation, or something else, I would highly recommend that you write code to transform it in both directions.

Reasons:

  • It makes testing easier. The best kinds of tests for things like this are round-trips, where you transform something in both directions and check it hasn’t changed. It’s really hard to mess up tests like that.
  • It often uncovers bugs, because it enforces clear thinking about what the transformation actually means.
  • It may improve your code, because it gets annoying writing similar-but-different code to transform in both directions, so you are pushed towards some kind of abstraction.

Also:

  • You almost certainly are going to need it. Sometimes things go wrong and you need to back up.
  • It will be incredibly useful for testing other parts of your code.

Bidirectional scheme up/downgrades are not easy in SQL, but probably worth it. If you’re writing transformation code in a normal programming language, it’s really not that difficult, and I predict it will be worth it.

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