Matrix is the only (chat) game in town

On my phone and computer I use WhatsApp, Signal, Slack, Keybase, Discord, IRC, XMPP/Jabber and Element/Matrix. In addition, I occasionally use the messaging features of Mastodon, Twitter and even LinkedIn. I’ve never used Telegram, Line, WeChat, Session, Wire or Status chat, but they exist too, along with many others.

It would be better if I could chat with people using the app I prefer, rather than the one I am forced to use.

Of course, the only useful chat app is the one your friends and family are on, so it’s pointless to debate the finer points in each service’s favour, but here I go anyway.

Only Matrix is:

The importance of decentralisation has been re-emphasised for me this week after the freenode IRC debacle. A single controlling entity, even when it is currently benign (as some people believe Signal is) is not a guarantee that things will stay this way. Thank goodness you can connect your usual IRC network to libera.chat: imagine what would happen to Signal users if they realised someone unscrupulous had acquired control.

Matrix does not solve all our problems. Notably:

  • Its security is probably not good enough for people threatened by powerful interests – at the moment it’s quite easy to see who’s talking to whom, and when.
  • Not all clients support end-to-end encryption, and not all turn it on by default (but the most-used ones do).

Despite these limitations, Matrix is the only chat network that is even attempting to provide what users need, and it seems to be doing a pretty good job of it.

I think we should work together to address its weaknesses, and adopt it wherever we can.

So, I recommend Matrix (specifically element.io) for group and individual chat.

Suspending the computer using Kupfer

I have recently started using Kupfer again as my application launcher in Ubuntu MATE, and I found it lacked the ability to suspend the computer.

Here is the plugin I wrote to support this.

To install it, quit Kupfer, create a directory in your home dir called .local/share/kupfer/plugins, and create this file suspend.py inside:

__kupfer_name__ = _("Power management")
__kupfer_sources__ = ("PowerManagementItemsSource", )
__description__ = _("Actions to suspend the computer")
__version__ = "2021-05-05"
__author__ = "Andy Balaam "


from kupfer.plugin import session_support as support


class Suspend (support.CommandLeaf):
    def __init__(self, commands):
        support.CommandLeaf.__init__(self, commands, "Suspend")
    def get_description(self):
        return _("Suspend the computer")
    def get_icon_name(self):
        return "system-suspend"


class PowerManagementItemsSource (support.CommonSource):
	def __init__(self):
		support.CommonSource.__init__(self, _("Power management"))
	def get_items(self):
		return (Suspend((["systemctl", "suspend"],)),)

# Copyright 2021 Andy Balaam, released under the MIT license.

Now restart Kupfer, go to Preferences, Plugins, and tick “Power management”.

You should now see a “Suspend” item if you search for it in the Kupfer interface.

Inspired by: Mate Session Management – Kupfer Plugin.

Reference docs: Kupfer Plugin API

Uploading to PeerTube from the command line

PeerTube’s API documentation gives an example of how to upload a video, but it is missing a couple of important aspects, most notably how to provide multiple tags use form-encoded input, so my more complete script is below. Use it like this:

# First, make sure jq is installed
echo "myusername" > username
echo "mypassword" > password
./upload "video_file.mp4"

Downsides:

  1. Your username and password are visible via ps to users on the same machine (tips to avoid this are welcome)
  2. I can’t work out how to include newlines in the video description (again, tips welcome)

You will need to edit the script to provide your own PeerTube server URL, channel ID (a number), video description, tags etc. Output and errors from the script will be placed in curl-out.txt. Read the API docs to see what numbers you need to use for category, license etc.

Here is upload:

#!/bin/bash

set -e
set -u

USERNAME="$(cat username)"
PASSWORD="$(cat password)"
FILE_PATH="$1"
CHANNEL_ID=MY_CHANNEL_ID_EG_1234
NAME="${FILE_PATH%.*}"
NAME="${NAME#*/}"

API_PATH="https://MY_PEERTUBE_SERVER_URL/api/v1"
## AUTH
client_id=$(curl -s "${API_PATH}/oauth-clients/local" | jq -r ".client_id")
client_secret=$(curl -s "${API_PATH}/oauth-clients/local" | jq -r ".client_secret")
token=$(curl -s "${API_PATH}/users/token" \
  --data client_id="${client_id}" \
  --data client_secret="${client_secret}" \
  --data grant_type=password \
  --data response_type=code \
  --data username="${USERNAME}" \
  --data password="${PASSWORD}" \
  | jq -r ".access_token")

echo "Uploading ${FILE_PATH}"
curl "${API_PATH}/videos/upload" \
  -H "Authorization: Bearer ${token}" \
  --output curl-out.txt \
  --max-time 6000 \
  --form videofile=@"${FILE_PATH}" \
  --form channelId=${CHANNEL_ID} \
  --form name="$NAME" \
  --form category=15 \
  --form licence=7 \
  --form description="MY_VIDEO_DESCRIPTION" \
  --form language=en \
  --form privacy=1 \
  --form tags="TAG1" \
  --form tags="TAG2" \
  --form tags="TAG3" \
  --form tags="TAG4"

Republishing Bartosz Milewski’s Category Theory lectures

Category Theory is an incredibly exciting and challenging area of Maths, that (among other things) can really help us understand what programming is on a fundamental level, and make us better programmers.

By far the best explanation of Category Theory that I have ever seen is a series of videos by Bartosz Milewski.

The videos on YouTube have quite a bit of background noise, and they were not available on PeerTube, so I asked for permission to edit and repost them, and Bartosz generously agreed! The conversation was in the comments section of Category Theory 1.1: Motivation and Philosophy and I reproduce it below.

So, I present these awesome videos, with background noise removed using Audacity, for your enjoyment:

Category Theory by Bartosz Milewski

Permission details:

Andy Balaam: Utterly brilliant lecture series.  Is it available under a free license?  I'd like to try and clean up audio and repost it to PeerTube, if that is permitted. Bartosz Milewski: You have my permission. I consider my lectures public domain.

Andy Balaam: Utterly brilliant lecture series. Is it available under a free license? I’d like to try and clean up audio and repost it to PeerTube, if that is permitted.
Bartosz Milewski: You have my permission. I consider my lectures public domain.