4,000 vs 400 vs 40 hours of software development practice

What is the skill difference between professional developers and newly minted computer science graduates?

Practice, e.g., 4,000 vs. 400 hours

People get better with practice, and after two years (around 4,000 hours) a professional developer will have had at least an order of magnitude more practice than most students; not just more practice, but advice and feedback from experienced developers. Most of these 4,000 hours are probably not the deliberate practice of 10,000 hours fame.

It’s understandable that graduates with a computing degree consider themselves to be proficient software developers; this opinion is based on personal experience (i.e., working with other students like themselves), and not having spent time working with professional developers. It’s not a joke that a surprising number of academics don’t appreciate the student/professional difference, the problem is that some academics only ever get to see a limit range of software development expertise (it’s a question of incentives).

Surveys of student study time have found that for Computer science, around 50% of students spend 11 hours or more, per week, in taught study and another 11 hours or more doing independent learning; let’s take 11 hours per week as the mean, and 30 academic weeks in a year. How much of the 330 hours per year of independent learning time is spent creating software (that’s 1,000 hours over a three-year degree, assuming that any programming is required)? I have no idea, and picked 40% because it matched up with 4,000.

Based on my experience with recent graduates, 400 hours sounds high (I have no idea whether an average student spends 4-hours per week doing programming assignments). While a rare few are excellent, most are hopeless. Perhaps the few hours per week nature of their coding means that they are constantly relearning, or perhaps they are just cutting and pasting code from the Internet.

Most graduates start their careers working in industry (around 50% of comp sci/maths graduates work in an ICT profession; UK higher-education data), which means that those working in industry are ideally placed to compare the skills of recent graduates and professional developers. Professional developers have first-hand experience of their novice-level ability. This is not a criticism of computing degrees; there are only so many hours in a day and lots of non-programming material to teach.

Many software developers working in industry don’t have a computing related degree (I don’t). Lots of non-computing STEM degrees give students the option of learning to program (I had to learn FORTRAN, no option). I don’t have any data on the percentage of software developers with a computing related degree, and neither do I have any data on the average number of hours non-computing STEM students spend on programming; I’ve cosen 40 hours to flow with the sequence of 4’s (some non-computing STEM students spend a lot more than 400 hours programming; I certainly did). The fact that industry hires a non-trivial number of non-computing STEM graduates as software developers suggests that, for practical purposes, there is not a lot of difference between 400 and 40 hours of practice; some companies will take somebody who shows potential, but no existing coding knowledge, and teach them to program.

Many of those who apply for a job that involves software development never get past the initial screening; something like 80% of people applying for a job that specifies the ability to code, cannot code. This figure is based on various conversations I have had with people about their company’s developer recruitment experiences; it is not backed up with recorded data.

Some of the factors leading to this surprisingly high value include: people attracted by the salary deciding to apply regardless, graduates with a computing degree that did not require any programming (there is customer demand for computing degrees, and many people find programming is just too hard for them to handle, so universities offer computing degrees where programming is optional), concentration of the pool of applicants, because those that can code exit the applicant pool, leaving behind those that cannot program (who keep on applying).

Apologies to regular readers for yet another post on professional developers vs. students, but I keep getting asked about this issue.

Students vs. professionals in software engineering experiments

Experiments are an essential component of any engineering discipline. When the experiments involve people, as subjects in the experiment, it is crucial that the subjects are representative of the population of interest.

Academic researchers have easy access to students, but find it difficult to recruit professional developers, as subjects.

If the intent is to generalize the results of an experiment to the population of students, then using student as subjects sounds reasonable.

If the intent is to generalize the results of an experiment to the population of professional software developers, then using student as subjects is questionable.

What it is about students that makes them likely to be very poor subjects, to use in experiments designed to learn about the behavior and performance of professional software developers?

The difference between students and professionals is practice and experience. Professionals have spent many thousands of hours writing code, attending meetings discussing the development of software; they have many more experiences of the activities that occur during software development.

The hours of practice reading and writing code gives professional developers a fluency that enables them to concentrate on the problem being solved, not on technical coding details. Yes, there are students who have this level of fluency, but most have not spent the many hours of practice needed to achieve it.

Experience gives professional developers insight into what is unlikely to work and what may work. Without experience students have no way of evaluating the first idea that pops into their head, or a situation presented to them in an experiment.

People working in industry are well aware of the difference between students and professional developers. Every year a fresh batch of graduates start work in industry. The difference between a new graduate and one with a few years experience is apparent for all to see. And no, Masters and PhD students are often not much better and in some cases worse (their prolonged sojourn in academia means that have had more opportunity to pick up impractical habits).

It’s no wonder that people in industry laugh when they hear about the results from experiments based on student subjects.

Just because somebody has “software development” in their job title does not automatically make they an appropriate subject for an experiment targeting professional developers. There are plenty of managers with people skills and minimal technical skills (sub-student level in some cases)

In the software related experiments I have run, subjects were asked how many lines of code they had read/written. The low values started at 25,000 lines. The intent was for the results of the experiments to be generalized to the population of people who regularly wrote code.

Psychology journals are filled with experimental papers that used students as subjects. The intent is to generalize the results to the general population. It has been argued that students are not representative of the general population in that they have spent more time reading, writing and reasoning than most people. These subjects have been labeled as WEIRD.

I spend a lot of time reading software engineering papers. If a paper involves human subjects, the first thing I do is find out whether the subjects were students (usual) or professional developers (not common). Authors sometimes put effort into dressing up their student subjects as having professional experience (perhaps some of them have spent a year or two in industry, but talking to the authors often reveals that the professional experience was tutoring other students), others say almost nothing about the identity of the subjects. Papers describing experiments using professional developers, trumpet this fact in the abstract and throughout the paper.

I usually delete any paper using student subjects, some of the better ones are kept in a subdirectory called students.

Software engineering researchers are currently going through another bout of hand wringing over the use of student subjects. One paper makes the point that a student based experiment is a good way of validating an experiment that will later involve professional developers. This is a good point, but ignored the problem that researchers rarely move on to using professional subjects; many researchers only ever intend to run student-based experiments. Also, they publish the results from the student based experiment, which are at best misleading (but academics get credit for publishing papers, not for the content of the papers).

Researchers are complaining that reviews are rejecting their papers on student based experiments. I’m pleased to hear that reviewers are rejecting these papers.