I don’t have hope

I don’t have hope about the state of society regarding support of trans people.

On Trans Day of Remembrance 2017 I organised and spoke at Coventry Pride’s event.
I delivered the following words to the attendees. Since I spent so much time crying over writing them, I’ll share them with you too.

Hope is defined in the Cambridge English Dictionary as: To want something to happen or to be true, and usually have a good reason to think that it might.

I am without hope.

As a trans person, although there is so much I want to happen or be true, I can’t see a good reason to think that these things will come to pass.

I dream of fast access to the health care I need.
Access to supportive and knowledgeable professionals whose job it is to know everything there is to know about existing treatments and who might need them. Professionals who listen to and provide for the needs of those who come into their care.
Professionals who are there to help, no matter what your label.
I dream of access to counsellors with whom I can freely discuss my problems and the mess of feelings without the weight of a cost, or time limit above me.

I shouldn’t have to resort to private care.

What we have, is a system of gatekeeping and long waiting lists where the people in need of care often know better what they need and what is available than the professionals with the authority to prescribe them that care.
Despite the pain trans people suffer every day, we have a system which is there to stop us getting care, rather than support us.

I want this system to improve, with a struggling NHS, I don’t see it happening fast enough to help many of those on the waiting lists in time.

I wish we could go a few months without an awful media story or TV show that insults and degrades trans people.

I wish I could wake up and see a trans person presenting the news, or an kids show with boys in skirts and girls in a tie.
I wish I could see bbc news headlines of surprise that someone would attack a trans person, in this day and age, rather than it being the headlines themselves attacking trans people.

But being trans is still controversial, theres still money in writing about and presenting us to those in society who hate us, think we’re weird and a waste of space.

I wish this would get better, but It’ll be a while before the bigots die out. Still long enough to make a few more 1000s of pounds on front-page articles, disgusting language and direct verbal attacks on morning TV.

I long to see gender studies taught in schools, for being trans to be a non-issue for everyone, for gender neutral facilities and language to be expected rather than a pleasant, rare, surprise.

I long to see children exploring their surroundings without the bounding of gender, freely learning who they are without feeling wrong, outlawed or upset if they don’t feel quite right about the gender they’re perceived to be.

I long to read a document that says Mr, Mrs, Mx and offers free text for your gender or skips it entirely.

This is closer to reality, but still nowhere near. Theres lots of places I don’t feel safe, lots of companies who just don’t understand, lots of children who still feel trapped and alone.

I don’t have hope.

But I do believe.

I believe in the power of this community to keep fighting and changing.
That we will support and protect our own.
That we will remember the friends no longer with us.
That we will remember our past and protest for a better future.
That we will educate and inspire.
That we will punch the nazis and remove the transphobes from power.
That we will complain to companies when their title and gender options are from the dark ages.
That we will write counter article after counter article until the media understand.

I believe that we will make a difference.

Pride Vibes 2017: Isle of Wight Pride

Isle of Wight Pride welcomed people of all ages to a fantastic event

Pride Vibes: As a photographer for Gay Pride Pics, I attend lots of Prides across the UK every year. Each Pride has a different feel. This series will describe what each Pride was like and what the vibe of the pride was like.

The entire series is my opinion and mine only. Take it as you will. Note that this opinion comes from a 20 something extroverted transwoman who is herself a pride organiser.

I’m still working out what this series is going to be like. Bear with me.

Previous: Coventry Pride

We were delighted to share Isle of Wight’s first ever Pride festival with the Isle’s inhabitants and visitors from the mainland.
The Isle of Wight Pride had already seen quite a lot of press coverage, such as the article from Isle of Wight County Press and the Isle of Wight’s former MP making homophobic statements and so attracted not only a lot of islanders, but also people turning up to support a Pride that proved much more controversial than expected.

TL;DR The event was absolutely incredible. It was the best Pride this season with by far the best vibes going. Inclusive, welcoming, and excited.

It felt like the whole island turned out for the parade.

The Isle of Wight Pride started with a parade through the town of Ryde.
I was astounded to see what seemed like the entire town, maybe the whole island’s population on the streets for the parade.
There was a diverse group of people watching the parade, we saw the old, young and everyone in between.

The buzz from the parade was huge, everyone was so excited to see a Pride parade in their small town.

The buzz from the parade was huge. Everyone was so excited to see a Pride parade in their small town. Everyone was showing their support for each other, and the marchers.

Everyone seemed so happy the the isle has a Pride

The parade featured mostly charities, with a few local branches of businesses present, and some larger ,more well known organisations like Outdoor Men and a surprisingly large contingent from the Scouts.
While nowhere near as long as larger, more established Pride parades like Birmingham or Exeter, the Isle of Wight parade was extremely long considering its their first one.

The parade finished at the Pavilion down by the beach with people tailing the end of the parade off the streets towards the entrance to the main event.

Unfortunately, the main event was ticketed, but free.
This is because of an old law preventing the Isle of Wight from holding an event with more than 5000 people attending.
5000 people is totally more than enough for a first Pride, but I certainly think that if it wasn't for this law, there would have been many more people there.

Isle of Wight Pride was such a happy, excited event

The main event, as mentioned, was held partly on the beach and partly on the beach front.
Isle of Wight Pride featured a reasonable set of stalls, mostly commercial, on their grassy section.

I felt that the large amounts of commercial stalls appeared like they were profiteering from the ‘pink pound’ as a lot of these stalls were not really specifically LGBT+ related.

Everyone was enjoying the isle’s first event

There were a few LGBT+ charities in attendance. I most noted the presence of Mermaids and was amazed to see them on the island.
Maybe it felt like there were a lot of commercial stalls because there really were not many stalls in total at all.

All stall holders were incredibly friendly and I enjoyed feeling very comfortable talking to them.
The feeling around the stalls was very relaxed and calm. They seemed to be seeing loads of custom and the two stages on the grassy area always had an audience sitting quietly and enjoying the shows being put on there.

People in the stalls area seemed just happy to be there and comfortable being who they are.

The beach was busy, but relaxed

The main stage was on the beach section, which was a totally different experience from any other Pride I’ve been to.
The beach was quiet at first before people really started arriving.

It got pretty busy on the beach, but managed to never feel packed and pushed together like some of the other prides. There was always room to move around through the crowd easily (even for me, a photographer with a big bag on!)
The beach stage did feature quite a lot of drag acts, 5 in total I think, but counteracted the large drag presence with powerful political statements and spoken word from several people including Peter Tatchall and Hannah Phillips. The main stage also featured plenty of musical performances across the day.

I was really happy to see Isle of Wight Pride welcome political statements on their stage. It really helped make me feel like the event is keen to maintain itself as a political pride which is well aware of its roots and all the work that still needs to be done by the Pride movement.

It should be noted that although the stage was on a sandy beach, IoW Pride put down plastic boards over some of the beach to allow wheeled personal transport like buggies and wheelchairs access to the main stage area, a great touch.

Unlike many Prides it was not overwhelmingly attended by students and young people, but saw a wide ranging attendance base from young people, young couples, young families alongside older people, and established families. Most Prides do see people from all age groups, but it was extremely striking at IoW to see people from every walk of life.

This diversity really enhanced the vibes of the event. It was such a happy event, but certainly not an alcohol-fueled party like so many other Prides can be.
I never felt uncomfortable with the level of drinking as I have been previously.

It seemed like everyone there was there to show their support for the Isle of Wight’s LGBT+ population, and that the Isle of Wight had Pride in their LGBT+ culture.
Despite the lower population of younger people, I really felt included in the event and all the people I spoke to were also loving it.

It should be noted, however, that it seemed like most attendees were white British people. Not surprising considering the pride was on a small island, but I’m fairly sure I could have counted the amount of people of colour on two hands.

For me, Isle of Wight Pride truly felt like people were proud to be there showing their colours.

Generally, the event was absolutely astounding. I was amazed to see such a wonderful, diverse turnout from the island.
The event had an excited vibe with people showing so much support for the LGBT+ community.
For me, Isle of Wight Pride truly felt like people were Proud to be there showing their colours.

Best Pride of the season so far.

Best of luck to the Isle of Wight Pride organisers and thank you for welcoming us to such a wonderful event.
May your future events continue to have the same vibes as this one.

Pride Vibes 2017: Exeter Pride

Young people in Exeter’s Pride Parade

Pride Vibes: As a photographer for Gay Pride Pics, I attend lots of Prides across the UK every year. Each Pride has a different feel. This series will describe what each Pride was like and what the vibe of the pride was like.

The entire series is my opinion and mine only. Take it as you will. Note that this opinion comes from a 20 something extroverted transwoman who is herself a pride organiser.

I’m still working out what this series is going to be like. Bear with me.

Next: Birmingham Pride

My first Pride of the 2017 season was eagerly anticipated. The weather looked promising and the prospect of attending a Pride I hadn't yet visited was exciting.

Exeter Pride 2017 is the 9th Pride in the city, run by an experienced team.

The flag is lifted at the start of the parade

Exeter’s Pride parade starts off at a Church in the centre of the city.
I arrived and was greeted by a very friendly and seemingly super well organised set of volunteers and organisers.

Gathering for the start of the parade took place in the grounds of the church.

I was really happy to see tens of young people being hustled by the volunteers to carry the super long rainbow flag. It felt super welcoming to see so many people younger than myself happy to be carrying the flag through the city.

I noted the lack of corporate groups in the initial parade organising.
The church grounds were buzzing with excitement.

As well as young people featuring in the parade there were a suitable amount of costume wearing people too. I spotted someone in a horse mask, furries, dragged up people and the parade was lead by The Centurion.

A huge rainbow flag carried by mostly young people, onlookers watch.

The parade wound through the city, attracting hundreds of onlookers, most of which didn’t seem to have planned to see a parade that day.

The parade was a very happy affair, everyone in it was really pleased to be there.

There were no chants during the parade and very few groups taking advantage of the platform to use it for protest.
I wouldn’t say it was a ‘carnival’ parade since it was mostly people walking holding onto the flag, but it certainly was not a protest march.

The police marched in the parade, as did a group of Christian pastors.

The parade was just about the right length and generally felt like a really nice place to be. I think this was mainly because it was almost entirely young people marching for themselves and for Pride, rather than corporations and charitable organisations.

Exeter Pride was relaxed

The main event was an outdoor field affair with a single stage, and a fair amount of community and commercial stalls.

Being a completely free to attend event, Exeter Pride maintained the relaxed and welcoming feel that the parade exuded.

Mostly people found their spot on the sunny grass and stayed there all day.
The event felt very chill and very calm.

Although there were bars were not fenced in, there was not a huge amount of uncomfortably drunk people around. People seemed to be content with eating the great food and didn't need to go wild, even into the evening.

I was made really comfortable by the Chair of Exeter Pride delivering a speech on the main stage at the beginning of the event, he said, amongst other things:

‘Straight people are welcome here, but you’re our guests in our space, remember that’

as well as making sure to remind people that:

‘Although many of us have won our battles, there are still members of our community who face adversity every day.’

That really helped me to to feel welcome.

Exeter Pride attracted all kinds of people

The event was attended by lots of different people. Although it was certainly awash with white faces, we saw young people, older people and disabled people attending and having a great time.

Overall, Exeter Pride managed to create a very safe feeling happy Pride with a great community feel and welcoming atmosphere.

Great job, organising committee!!

Next in the Series: Birmingham Pride

Volunteers at Exeter Pride.