Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2017

The Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2017 was enacted by the US Congress on 21st December.

A variety of US Federal agencies are responsible for ensuring the safety of US citizens, in some cases this safety is dependent on the behavior of software. The FDA is responsible for medical device safety and the FAA publishes various software safety handbooks relating to aviation (the Department of transportation has a wider remit).

Where do people go to learn about the evidence for software related issues?

The book: Evidence-based software engineering: based on the publicly available evidence sounds like a good place to start.

Quickly skimming this (currently draft) book shows that no public evidence is available on lots of issues. Oops.

Another issue is the evidence pointing to some suggested practices being at best useless and sometimes fraudulent, e.g., McCabe’s cyclomatic complexity metric.

The initial impact of evidence-based policymaking will be companies pushing back against pointless government requirements, in particular requirements that cost money to implement. In some cases this is a good, e.g., no more charades about software being more testable because its code has a low McCable complexity.

In the slightly longer term, people are going to have to get serious about collecting and analyzing software related evidence.

The Open, Public, Electronic, and Necessary Government Data Act or the OPEN Government Data Act (which is about to become law) will be a big help in obtaining evidence. I think there is a lot of software related data sitting on disks and tapes, waiting to be analysed (NASA appears to have loads to data that they have down almost nothing with, including not making it publicly available).

Interesting times ahead.