Software research is 200 years behind biology research

Evidence-based software research requires access to data, and Github has become the primary source of raw material for many (most?) researchers.

Parallels are starting to emerge between today’s researchers exploring Github and biologists exploring nature centuries ago.

Centuries ago scientific expeditions undertook difficult and hazardous journeys to various parts of the world, collecting and returning with many specimens which were housed and displayed in museums and botanical gardens. Researchers could then visit the museums and botanical gardens to study these specimens, without leaving the comforts of their home country. What is missing from these studies of collected specimens is information on the habitat in which they lived.

Github is a living museum of specimens that today’s researchers can study without leaving the comforts of their research environment. What is missing from these studies of collected specimens is information on the habitat in which the software was created.

Github researchers are starting the process of identifying and classifying specimens into species types, based on their defining characteristics, much like the botanist Carl_Linnaeus identified stamens as one of the defining characteristics of flowering plants. Some of the published work reads like the authors did some measurements, spotted some differences, and then invented a plausible story around what they had found. As a sometime inhabitant of this glasshouse I will refrain from throwing stones.

Zoologists study the animal kingdom, and entomologists specialize in the insect world, e.g., studying Butterflys. What name might be given to researchers who study software source code, and will there be specialists, e.g., those who study cryptocurrency projects?

The ecological definition of a biome, as the community of plants and animals that have common characteristics for the environment they exist in, maps to the end-user use of software systems. There does not appear to be a generic name for people who study the growth of plants and animals (or at least I cannot think of one).

There is only so much useful information that can be learned from studying specimens in museums, no matter how up to date the specimens are.

Studying the development and maintenance of software systems in the wild (i.e., dealing with the people who do it), requires researchers to forsake their creature comforts and undertake difficult and hazardous journeys into industry. While they are unlikely to experience any physical harm, there is a real risk that their egos will be seriously bruised.

I want to do what I can to prevent evidence-based software engineering from just being about mining Github. So I have a new policy for dealing with PhD/MSc student email requests for data (previously I did my best to point them at the data they sought). From now on, I will tell students that they need to behave like real researchers (e.g., Charles Darwin) who study software development in the wild. Charles Darwin is a great role model who should appeal to their sense of adventure (alternative suggestions welcome).

EDG and Github are both logical purchases for Microsoft

It looks like my prediction that Microsoft buys Github may be about to come true.

Microsoft has been sluggish in integrating their LinkedIn purchase into their identity management system. Lots of sites have verify identity using Github options (or at least the kind of sites I visit do), so perhaps LinkedIn identity will be trialed via Github.

A Github purchase will also allow Microsoft to directly connect lots of developers to Azure. Being able to easily build and execute Github code on Azure is the bait, customer data is where the money is; making Github more data friendly is an obvious first priority for new owners.

Who else should Microsoft buy? As a protective move, I think they should snap up Edison Design Group (EDG) before somebody else does. Readers outside of the compiler/static analysis/C++ standards world are unlikely to have heard of EDG. They sell C/C++ front ends (plus other languages) that support all the historical features/warts supported by other C/C++ compilers. The features only found in Microsoft’s compilers is what make it very costly/time-consuming for many companies to port their applications to other platforms; developer use of Microsoft compiler dependent features is a moat that makes it difficult for many companies to leave the Microsoft ecosystem. EDG have been in the business a long time and have built up an extensive knowledge of vendor specific compiler features; the kind of knowledge that can only be obtained by having customers tell you what language constructs they are using that your current product does not handle (and what those constructs actually mean).

What would happen if a very large company bought EDG, and open sourced its code (to make it easier for Windows developers to switch platforms, not to make any money off compiler related tools)? Somebody would have to bolt on a back-end, to generate code; but that would not be hard (EDG have designed their product to make this easy). A freely available compiler, supporting all/most of the foibles of the Microsoft C++ compiler, would tempt many Windows only developers to give it a go. A free compiler removes management from the loop, developers can try things out as a side project, without having to get management approval to spend money on a compiler (from practical experience I know how hard it is to sell compatible compiler products, i.e., there is no real money to be made by anybody doing this commercially).

Is this risk, to Microsoft, really worth the (relatively) low cost of buying EDG? The EDG guys are not getting any younger, why wouldn’t they be willing sell?