Fishing for software data

During 2021 I sent around 100 emails whose first line started something like: “I have been reading your interesting blog post…”, followed by some background information, and then a request for software engineering data. Sometimes the request for data was specific (e.g., the data associated with the blog post), and sometimes it was a general request for any data they might have.

So far, these 100 email requests have produced one two datasets. Around 80% failed to elicit a reply, compared to a 32% no reply for authors of published papers. Perhaps they don’t have any data, and don’t think a reply is worth the trouble. Perhaps they have some data, but it would be a hassle to get into a shippable state (I like this idea because it means that at least some people have data). Or perhaps they don’t understand why anybody would be interested in data and must be an odd-ball, and not somebody they want to engage with (I may well be odd, but I don’t bite :-).

Some of those who reply, that they don’t have any data, tell me that they don’t understand why I might be interested in data. Over my entire professional career, in many other contexts, I have often encountered surprise that data driven problem-solving increases the likelihood of reaching a workable solution. The seat of the pants approach to problem-solving is endemic within software engineering.

Others ask what kind of data I am interested in. My reply is that I am interested in human software engineering data, pointing out that lots of Open source is readily available, but that data relating to the human factors underpinning software development is much harder to find. I point them at my evidence-based book for examples of human centric software data.

In business, my experience is that people sometimes get in touch years after hearing me speak, or reading something I wrote, to talk about possible work. I am optimistic that the same will happen through my requests for data, i.e., somebody I emailed will encounter some data and think of me 🙂

What is different about 2021 is that I have been more willing to fail, and not just asking for data when I encounter somebody who obviously has data. That is to say, my expectation threshold for asking is lower than previous years, i.e., I am more willing to spend a few minutes crafting a targeted email on what appear to be tenuous cases (based on past experience).

In 2022 I plan to be even more active, in particular, by giving talks and attending lots of meetups (London based). If your company is looking for somebody to give an in-person lunchtime talk, feel free to contact me about possible topics (I’m always after feedback on my analysis of existing data, and will take a 10-second appeal for more data).

Software data is not commonly available because most people don’t collect data, and when data is collected, no thought is given to hanging onto it. At the moment, I don’t think it is possible to incentivize people to collect data (i.e., no saleable benefit to offset the cost of collecting it), but once collected the cost of hanging onto data is peanuts. So as well as asking for data, I also plan to sell the idea of hanging onto any data that is collected.

Fishing tips for software data welcome.

Wooohooo – River Wye Springer

Woooohoooo. I've caught my first River Wye Springer. Thirty-four inches long, nineteen inches fat, eighteen pounds exactly. I caught it on the Monument pool of the Tunnel beat on a green and yellow devon minnow (a technique I'd never used before). Huge thanks to my friend Steve Roberts for skilfully guiding me.


Before setting off for this fishing trip I'd been stumped on a cyber-dojo fault which eluded me for the best part of a day. After the trip, I cracked it within five minutes. So you see, fishing fixes faults!

Wooohooo – River Wye Springer

Woooohoooo. I've caught my first River Wye Springer. Thirty-four inches long, nineteen inches fat, eighteen pounds exactly. I caught it on the Monument pool of the Tunnel beat on a green and yellow devon minnow (a technique I'd never used before). Huge thanks to my friend Steve Roberts for skilfully guiding me.


Before setting off for this fishing trip I'd been stumped on a cyber-dojo fault which eluded me for the best part of a day. After the trip, I cracked it within five minutes. So you see, fishing fixes faults!