Anthropological studies of software engineering

Anthropology is the study of humans, and as such it is the top level research domain for many of the human activities involved in software engineering. What has been discovered by the handful of anthropologists who have spent time researching the tiny percentage of humans involved in writing software?

A common ‘discovery’ is that developers don’t appear to be doing what academics in computing departments claim they do; hardly news to those working in industry.

The main subfields relevant to software are probably: cultural anthropology and social anthropology (in the US these are combined under the name sociocultural anthropology), plus linguistic anthropology (how language influences social life and shapes communication). There is also historical anthropology, which is technically what historians of computing do.

For convenience, I’m labelling anybody working in an area covered by anthropology as an anthropologist.

I don’t recommend reading any anthropology papers unless you plan to invest a lot of time in some subfield. While I have read lots of software engineering papers, anthropologist’s papers on this topic are often incomprehensible to me. These papers might best be described as anthropology speak interspersed with software related terms.

Anthropologists write books, and some of them are very readable to a more general audience.

The Art of Being Human: A Textbook for Cultural Anthropology by Wesch is a beginner’s introduction to its subject.

Ethnography, which explores cultural phenomena from the point of view of the subject of the study, is probably the most approachable anthropological research. Ethnographers spend many months living with a remote tribe, community, or nowadays a software development company, and then write-up their findings in a thesis/report/book. Examples of approachable books include: “Engineering Culture: Control and Commitment in a High-Tech Corporation” by Kunda, who studied a large high-tech company in the mid-1980s; “No-Collar: The Humane Workplace and its Hidden Costs” by Ross, who studied an internet startup that had just IPO’ed, and “Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking” by Coleman, who studied hacker culture.

Linguistic anthropology is the field whose researchers are mostly likely to match developers’ preconceived ideas about what humanities academics talk about. If I had been educated in an environment where Greek and nineteenth century philosophers were the reference points for any discussion, then I too would use this existing skill set in my discussions of source code (philosophers of source code did not appear until the twentieth century). Who wouldn’t want to apply hermeneutics to the interpretation of source code (the field is known as Critical code studies)?

It does not help that the software knowledge of many of the academics appears to have been acquired by reading computer books from the 1940s and 1950s.

The most approachable linguistic anthropology book I have found, for developers, is: The Philosophy of Software Code and Mediation in the Digital Age by Berry (not that I have skimmed many).