Evolution of the DORA metrics

There is a growing buzz around the DORA metrics. Where did the DORA metrics come from, what are they, and are they useful?

The company DevOps Research and Assessment LLC (DORA) was founded by Nicole Forsgren, Jez Humble, and Gene Kim in 2016, and acquired by Google in 2018. DevOps is a role that combines software development (Dev) and IT operations (Ops).

The original ideas behind the DORA metrics are described in the 2015 paper DevOps: Profiles in ITSM Performance and Contributing Factors, by Forsgren and Humble. The more well known Accelerate book, published in 2018, is an evangelistic reworking of the material, plus some business platitudes extolling the benefits of using a lean process.

The 2015 paper approaches the metric selection process from the perspective of reducing business costs, and uses a data driven approach. This is how metric selection should be done, and for the first seven or eight pages I was cheering the authors on. The validity of a data driven approaches depends on the reliability of the data and its applicability to the questions being addressed. I don’t think that the reliability of the data used is sufficient to support the conclusions being drawn from it. The data used is the survey results behind the Puppet Labs 2015 State of DevOps Report; the 2018 book included data from the 2016 and 2017 State of DevOps reports.

Between 2015-2018, DORA is more a way of doing DevOps than a collection of metrics to calculate. The theory is based on ideas from the Economic Order Quantity model; this model is used in inventory management to calculate the number of items that should be held in stock, to meet production demand, such that stock holding costs plus item reordering costs are minimised (when the number of items in stock falls below some value, there is an optimum number of items to reorder to replenish stocks).

The DORA mapping of the Economic Order Quantity model to DevOps employs a rather liberal interpretation of the concepts involved. There are three fundamental variables:

  • Batch size: the quantity of additions, modifications and deletions of anything that could have an effect on IT services, e.g., changes to code or configuration files,
  • Holding cost: the lost opportunity cost of not deploying work that has been done, e.g., lost business because a feature is not available or waste because an efficiency improvement is not used. Cognitive capitalism also has the lost opportunity cost of not learning about the impact of an update on the ecosystem,
  • Transaction cost: the cost of building, testing and deploying to production a completed batch.

The aim is to minimise TotalCost=HoldingCost+TransationCost.

So far, so good and reasonable.

Now the details; how do we measure batch size, holding cost and transaction cost?

DORA does not measure these quantities (the paper points out that deployment frequency could be treated as a proxy for batch size, in that as deployment frequency goes to infinity batch size goes to zero). The terms holding cost and transaction cost do not appear in the 2018 book.

Having mapped Economic Order Quantity variables to software, the 2015 paper pivots and maps these variables to a Lean manufacturing process (the 2018 book focuses on Lean). Batch size is now deployment frequency, and higher is better.

Ok, let’s follow the pivoted analysis of Lean ideas applied to software. The 2015 paper uses cluster analysis to find patterns in the 2015 State of DevOps survey data. I have not seen any of the data, or even the questions asked; the description of the analysis is rather sketchy (I imagine it is similar to that used by Forsgren in her PhD thesis on a different dataset). The report published by Puppet Labs analyses the data using linear regression and partial least squares.

Three IT performance profiles are characterized (High, Medium and Low). Why three and not, say, four or five? The papers simply says that three ’emerged’.

The analysis of the Puppet Labs 2015 survey data (6k+ responses) essentially takes the form of listing differences in values of various characteristics between High/Medium/Low teams; responses came from “technical professionals of all specialities involved in DevOps”. The analysis in the 2018 book discussed some of the between year differences.

My experience of asking hundreds of people for data is that most don’t have any. I suspect this is true of those who answered the Puppet Labs surveys, and that answers are guestimates.

The fact that the accuracy of analysis of the survey data is poor does not really matter, because DORA pivots again.

This pivot switches to organizational metrics (from team metrics), becomes purely production focused (very appropriate for DevOps), introduces an Elite profile, and focuses on four key metrics; the following is adapted from Google:

  • Deployment Frequency: How often an organization successfully releases to production,
  • Lead Time for Changes: The amount of time it takes a commit to get into production,
  • Change Failure Rate: The percentage of deployments causing a failure in production,
  • Mean time to repair (MTTR): How long it takes an organization to recover from a failure in production.

Are these four metrics useful?

To somebody with zero DevOps experience (i.e., me) they look useful. The few DevOps people I have spoken to are talking about them but not using them (not least because they don’t have the data required).

The characteristics of the Elite/High/Medium/Low profiles reflects Google’s DevOps business interests. Companies offering an online service at a national scale want to quickly respond to customer demand, continuously deploy, and quickly recover from service outages.

There are companies where it makes business sense for DevOps deployments to occur much less frequently than at Google. I also know companies who would love to have deployment rates within an order of magnitude of Google’s, but cannot even get close without a significant restructuring of their build and deployment infrastructure.