Publishing information on project progress: will it impact delivery?

Numbers for delivery date and cost estimates, for a software project, depend on who you ask (the same is probably true for other kinds of projects). The people actually doing the work are likely to have the most accurate information, but their estimates can still be wildly optimistic. The managers of the people doing the work have to plan (i.e., make worst/best case estimates) and deal with people outside the team (i.e., sell the project to those paying for it); planning requires knowledge of where things are and where they need to be, while selling requires being flexible with numbers.

A few weeks ago I was at a hackathon organized by the people behind the Project Data and Analytics meetup. The organizers (Martin Paver & co.) had obtained some very interesting project related data sets. I worked on the Australian ICT dashboard data.

The Australian ICT dashboard data was courtesy of the Queensland state government, which has a publicly available dashboard listing digital project expenditure; the Victorian state government also has a dashboard listing ICT expenditure. James Smith has been collecting this data on a monthly basis.

What information might meaningfully be extracted from monthly estimates of project delivery dates and costs?

If you were running one of these projects, and had to provide monthly figures, what strategy would you use to select the numbers? Obviously keep quiet about internal changes for as long as possible (today’s reduction can be used to offset a later increase, or vice versa). If the client requests changes which impact date/cost, then obviously update the numbers immediately; the answer to the question about why the numbers changed is that, “we are responding to client requests” (i.e., we would otherwise still be on track to meet the original end-points).

What is the intended purpose of publishing this information? Is it simply a case of the public getting fed up with overruns, with publishing monthly numbers is seen as a solution?

What impact could monthly publication have? Will clients think twice before requesting an enhancement, fearing public push back? Will companies doing the work make more reliable estimates, or work harder?

Project delivery dates/costs change because new functionality/work-to-do is discovered, because the appropriate staff could not be hired and other assorted unknown knowns and unknowns.

Who is looking at this data (apart from half a dozen people at a hackathon on the other side of the world)?

Data on specific projects can only be interpreted in the context of that project. There is some interesting research to be done on the impact of public availability on client and vendor reporting behavior.

Will publication have an impact on performance? One way to get some idea is to run an A/B experiment. Some projects have their data made public, others don’t. Wait a few years, and compare project performance for the two publication regimes.