Static site migration – we have working comments with isso!

One “biggie” that was holding up this blog’s migration to a static site was getting a comments system up and running, followed by importing the existing comments. I had picked Isso a while back as it allows for easy import of existing comments from WordPress. I really didn’t want to depend on a third party […]

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Performance impact of comments on tasks taking a few minutes

How cost-effective is an investment in commenting code?

Answering this question requires knowing the time needed to write the comment and the time they save for later readers of the code.

A recent study investigated the impact of comments in small programming tasks on developer performance, and Sebastian Nielebock, the first author, kindly sent me a copy of the data.

How might the performance impact of comments be measured?

The obvious answer is to ask subjects to solve a coding problem, with half the subjects working with code containing comments and the other half the same code without the comments. This study used three kinds of commenting: No comments, Implementation comments and Documentation comments; the source was in Java.

Were the comments in the experiment useful, in the sense of providing information that was likely to save readers some time? A preliminary run was used to check that the comments provided some benefit.

The experiment was designed to be short enough that most subjects could complete it in less than an hour (average time to complete all tasks was 31 minutes). My own experience with running experiments is that it is possible to get professional developers to donate an hour of their time.

What is a realistic and experimentally useful amount of work to ask developers to in an hour?

The authors asked subjects to complete 9-tasks; three each of applying the code (i.e., use the code’s API), fix a bug in the code, and extend the code. Would a longer version of one of each, rather than a shorter three of each been better? I think the only way to find out is to try it both ways (I hope the authors plan to do another version).

What were the results (code+data)?

Regular readers will know, from other posts discussing experiments, that the biggest factor is likely to be subject (professional developers+students) differences, and this is true here.

Based on a fitted regression model, Documentation comments slowed performance on a task by 30 seconds, compared to No comments and Implementation comments (which both had the same performance impact). Given that average task completion time was 205 seconds, this is a 15% slowdown for Documentation comments.

This study set out to measure the performance impact of comments on small programming tasks. The answer, at least for tasks designed to take a few minutes, is that No comments, or if comments are required, then write Implementation comments.

This experiment measured the performance impact of comments on developers who did not write the code containing them. These developers have to first read and understand the comments (which takes time). However, the evidence suggests that code is mostly modified by the developer who wrote it (just reading the code does not leave a record that can be analysed). In this case, the reading a comment (that the developer previously wrote) can trigger existing memories, i.e., it has a greater information content for the original author.

Will comments have a bigger impact when read by the person who wrote them (and the code), or on tasks taking more than a few minutes? I await the results of more experiments…