Pathfinder – baron m.

Welcome Sir R-----! Pray shed your overcoat and come dry yourself by the fire. I am told that these spring showers are of inestimable benefit to farming folk, but I fail to grasp why they can’t show the good manners to desist until noblemen have made their way indoors.

Will you join me in a warming measure and perchance a small wager?

I had no doubt sir!

I’ve a mind for a game oft played by the tribesmen of Borneo upon the cobbled floors of their homes as a means of practice for their legendary talent in forging paths through the dense forests in which they dwell.

On Pitfall – student

Recall that in the Baron's latest wager, Sir R-----'s goal was to traverse a three by three checkerboard in steps determined by casts of a four sided die, each at a cost of two coins. Moving from left to right upon the first rank and advancing to the second upon its third file, thereafter from right to left and advancing upon the first file and finally from left to right again, he should have prevailed for a prize of twenty five coins had he landed upon the top right place. Frustrating his progress, however, were the rules that landing upon a black square dropped him back down to the first rank and that overshooting the last file upon the last rank required that he should move in reverse by as many places with which he had done so.

Pitfall – baron m.

Greetings Sir R-----! Come warm yourself by the hearth and take a dram of scotch!

Would you care for a wager to fire up your blood?

Stout fellow!

I propose a game that puts me in mind of an ill-fated caving expedition that I undertook some several years ago.

On A Day At The Races – student

Most recently the Baron challenged Sir R----- to a race of knights around the perimeter of a chessboard, with the Baron starting upon the lower right hand square and Sir R----- upon the lower left. The chase proceeded anticlockwise with the Baron moving four squares at each turn and Sir R----- by the roll of a die. Costing Sir R----- one cent to play, his goal was to catch or overtake the Baron before he reached the first rank for which he would receive a prize of forty one cents for each square that the Baron still had to traverse before reaching it.

A Day At The Races – baron m.

Halloo Sir R-----! Pray come join me and partake of a glass of this rather excellent potation!

Might I again tempt you with a wager?

Splendid!

I have in mind a game that always reminds me of my victory upon the turf at Newmarket. Ordinarily I would not participate in a public sporting event such as this since I am at heart a modest man and derive no pleasure in demonstrating my substantial superiority over my fellows.

On Tug O’ War – student

The Baron and Sir R-----'s latest wager comprised of first placing a draught piece upon the fifth lowest of a column of twelve squares and subsequently moving it up or down by one space depending upon the outcome of a coin toss until such time as it should escape, either by moving above the topmost or below the bottommost square. In the former outcome the Baron should have had a prize of three coins and in the latter Sir R----- should have had two.

Tug O’ War – baron m.

Season's greetings Sir R-----! Come take a glass of mulled wine to warm your spirits on this chill winter's night!

Will you also accept a wager to warm your blood?

It gladdens my heart to hear so sir!

I propose a game that oft puts me in mind of the banquet held in the great hall upon Mount Olympus to which I was invited as the guest of honour by Zeus himself!

We Three Kings – baron m.

Sir R----- my fine friend! Will you take a glass of perry with me to cool yourself from this summer heat?

Good man!

Might I also presume that you are in the mood for a wager?

Stout fellow!

I suggest a game that ever puts me in mind of that time in my youth when I squired for the warrior king Balthazar during his pilgrimage with kings Melchior and Caspar to the little town of Bethlehem.

On Two By Two – student

The Baron's most recent wager with Sir R----- set him the challenge of being the last to remove a horizontally, vertically or diagonally adjacent pair of draughts from a five by five square of them, with the Baron first taking a single draught and Sir R----- and he thereafter taking turns to remove such pairs.

When I heard these rules I was reminded of the game of Cram and could see that, just like it, the key to figuring the outcome is to recognise that the Baron could always have kept the remaining draughts in a state of symmetry, thereby ensuring that however Sir R----- had chosen he shall subsequently have been free to make a symmetrically opposing choice.

Two By Two – baron m.

Hello there Sir R-----! Come join me by the hearth for a dram of warming spirits! I trust that this cold spell has not chilled your desire for a wager?

Good man! Good man!

I must say that the contrast between the warmth of this fire and the frost outside brings most vividly to my mind an occasion during my tenure as the Empress's ambassador to the land of Oz; specifically the time that I attended King Quadling Rex's winter masked ball during which his southern palace was overrun by an infestation of Snobbles!

On Onwards And Downwards – student

When last they met, the Baron challenged Sir R----- to evade capture whilst moving rooks across and down a chessboard. Beginning with a single rook upon the first file and last rank, the Baron should have advanced it to the second file and thence downwards in rank in response to which Sir R----- should have progressed a rook from beneath the board by as many squares and if by doing so had taken the Baron's would have won the game. If not, Sir R----- could then have chosen either rook, barring one that sits upon the first rank, to move to the next file in the same manner with the Baron responding likewise. With the game continuing in this fashion and ending if either of them were to take a rook moved by the other or if every file had been played upon, the Baron should have had a coin from Sir R----- if he took a piece and Sir R----- one of the Baron's otherwise.

Onwards And Downwards – baron m.

Greetings Sir R-----! Might I suggest that you take one of these spiced beef pies and a mug of mulled cider to stave off this winter chill? And perhaps a wager to fire the blood?

Good man! Good man!

I propose a game that ever puts me in mind of my ill-fated expedition to recover for the glory of the Empress of Russia the priceless Amulet of Yendor from the very depths of Hell.

On Blockade – student

Recall that the Baron's game is comprised of taking turns to place dominoes on a six by six grid of squares with each domino covering a pair of squares. At no turn was a player allowed to place a domino such that it created an oddly-numbered region of empty squares and Sir R----- was to be victorious if, at the end of play, the lines running between the ranks and files of the board were each and every one straddled by at least one domino.

Blockade – baron m.

Good heavens Sir R----- you look quite pallid! Come take a seat and let me fetch you a measure of rum to restore your humors.
To further improve your sanguinity might I suggest a small wager?

Splendid fellow!

I have in mind a game invented to commemorate my successfully quashing the Caribbean zombie uprising some few several years ago. Now, as I'm sure you well know, zombies have ever been a persistent, if sporadic, scourge of those islands. On that occasion, however, there arose a formidable leader from amongst their number; the zombie Lord J------ the Insensate.

On Turnabout Is Fair Play – student

Last time they met, the Baron challenged Sir R----- to turn a square of twenty five coins, all but one of which the Baron had placed heads up, to tails by flipping vertically or horizontally adjacent pairs of heads.
As I explained to the Baron, although I'm not at all sure that he was following me, this is essentially the mutilated chess board puzzle and can be solved by exactly the same argument. Specifically, we need simply imagine that the game were played upon a five by five checker board...

On Turnabout Is Fair Play – student

Last time they met, the Baron challenged Sir R----- to turn a square of twenty five coins, all but one of which the Baron had placed heads up, to tails by flipping vertically or horizontally adjacent pairs of heads.
As I explained to the Baron, although I'm not at all sure that he was following me, this is essentially the mutilated chess board puzzle and can be solved by exactly the same argument. Specifically, we need simply imagine that the game were played upon a five by five checker board...

Turnabout Is Fair Play – baron m.

Why, you look chilled to the bone Sir R-----! Come sit by the hearth and warm yourself whilst I fetch you a medicinal glass of brandy.
To your very good health sir! Will you join me in a wager whilst you recover?

Good show!

I propose a game that I learned upon the banks of the river Styx whilst my fellow travellers and I were waiting for the ferry. This being the third time that I had died, I was quite accustomed to the appalling service quality of the Hadean public transport system and so was most appreciative of a little sport to pass the time.

Turnabout Is Fair Play – baron m.

Why, you look chilled to the bone Sir R-----! Come sit by the hearth and warm yourself whilst I fetch you a medicinal glass of brandy.
To your very good health sir! Will you join me in a wager whilst you recover?

Good show!

I propose a game that I learned upon the banks of the river Styx whilst my fellow travellers and I were waiting for the ferry. This being the third time that I had died, I was quite accustomed to the appalling service quality of the Hadean public transport system and so was most appreciative of a little sport to pass the time.