Building cross-platform Rust for Web, Android and iOS – a minimal example

One of the advantages of writing code in Rust is that it can be re-used in other places. Both iOS and Android allow using native libraries within your apps, and Rust compiles to native. Web pages can now use WebAssembly (WASM), and Rust can compile to WASM.

So, it should be easy, right?

Well, in practice it seems a little tricky, so I created a small example project to explain it to myself, so maybe it’s helpful to you too.

The full code is at gitlab.com/andybalaam/example-rust-bindings, but here is the general idea:

crates/example-rust-bindings - the real Rust code
bindings/ffi - uniffi code to build shared objects for Android and iOS
bindings/wasm - wasm_bingen code to build WASM for Web
examples/example-android - an Android app that generates a Kotlin wrapper, and runs the code in the shared object
examples/example-web - a web page that imports the WASM and runs it

Steps for WASM

Proof that I did this on Web - Firefox showing "This string is from Rust!"

Variation: if you modify the build script in package.json to call wasm-pack with --target node instead of --target web you can generate code suitable for using from a NodeJS module.

Steps for Android

Proof that I did this on Android: Android emulator showing a label "This string is from Rust!"

Steps for iOS

I am working on this and will fill it in later.

Example Android project with repeatable tests running inside an emulator

I’ve spent the last couple of days fighting the Android command line to set up a simple project that can run automated tests inside an emulator reliably and repeatably.

To make the tests reliable and independent from anything else on my machine, I wanted to store the Android SDK and AVD files in a local directory.

To do this I had to define a lot of inter-related environment variables, and wrap the tools in scripts that ensure they run with the right flags and settings.

The end result of this work is here: gitlab.com/andybalaam/android-skeleton

You need all the utility scripts included in that repo for it to work, but some highlights include:

The environment variables that I source in every script, scripts/paths:

PROJECT_ROOT=$(dirname $(dirname $(realpath ${BASH_SOURCE[${#BASH_SOURCE[@]} - 1]})))
export ANDROID_SDK_ROOT="${PROJECT_ROOT}/android_sdk"
export ANDROID_SDK_HOME="${ANDROID_SDK_ROOT}"
export ANDROID_EMULATOR_HOME="${ANDROID_SDK_ROOT}/emulator-home"
export ANDROID_AVD_HOME="${ANDROID_EMULATOR_HOME}/avd"

Creation of a local.properties file that tells Gradle and Android Studio where the SDK is, by running something like this:

echo "# File created automatically - changes will be overwritten!" > local.properties
echo "sdk.dir=${ANDROID_SDK_ROOT}" >> local.properties

The wrapper scripts for Android tools e.g. scripts/sdkmanager:

#!/bin/bash

set -e
set -u

source scripts/paths

"${ANDROID_SDK_ROOT}/tools/bin/sdkmanager" \
    "--sdk_root=${ANDROID_SDK_ROOT}" \
    "$@"

The wrapper for avdmanager is particularly interesting since it seems we need to override where it thinks the tools directory is for it to work properly – scripts/avdmanager:

#!/bin/bash

set -e
set -u

source scripts/paths

# Set toolsdir to include "bin/" since avdmanager seems to go 2 dirs up
# from that to find the SDK root?
AVDMANAGER_OPTS="-Dcom.android.sdkmanager.toolsdir=${ANDROID_SDK_ROOT}/tools/bin/" \
    "${ANDROID_SDK_ROOT}/tools/bin/avdmanager" "$@"

An installation script that must be run once before using the project scripts/install-android-tools:

#!/bin/bash

set -e
set -u
set -x

source scripts/paths

mkdir -p "${ANDROID_SDK_ROOT}"
mkdir -p "${ANDROID_AVD_HOME}"
mkdir -p "${ANDROID_EMULATOR_HOME}"

# Download sdkmanager, avdmanager etc.
cd "${ANDROID_SDK_ROOT}"
test -f commandlinetools-*.zip || \
    wget -q 'https://dl.google.com/android/repository/commandlinetools-linux-6200805_latest.zip'
unzip -q -u commandlinetools-*.zip
cd ..

# Ask sdkmanager to update itself
./scripts/sdkmanager --update

# Install the emulator and tools
yes | ./scripts/sdkmanager --install 'emulator' 'platform-tools'

# Platforms
./scripts/sdkmanager --install 'platforms;android-21'
./scripts/sdkmanager --install 'platforms;android-29'

# Install system images for our oldest and newest supported API versions
yes | ./scripts/sdkmanager --install 'system-images;android-21;default;x86_64'
yes | ./scripts/sdkmanager --install 'system-images;android-29;default;x86_64'

# Create AVDs to run the system images
echo no | ./scripts/avdmanager -v \
    create avd \
    -f \
    -n "avd-21" \
    -k "system-images;android-21;default;x86_64" \
    -p ${ANDROID_SDK_ROOT}/avds/avd-21
echo no | ./scripts/avdmanager -v \
    create avd \
    -f \
    -n "avd-29" \
    -k "system-images;android-29;default;x86_64" \
    -p ${ANDROID_SDK_ROOT}/avds/avd-29

Please do contribute to the project if you know easier ways to do this stuff.

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