Quick agile diagnostic

Tactics

My online agile diagnostic will quickly captures the most pertinent facts about your agile team. I can then do an brief review of actions which can help the team meet your aims and objectives.

The quickest way to explain the agile diagnostic is to take it. At the end you can schedule a conversations with me – no fee, no obligation. (If you are really short of time just schedule the conversation!)

The post Quick agile diagnostic appeared first on Allan Kelly Associates.

Xanpan – free eBook now!

Hypothesis: If I offer people a free copy of my Xanpan eBook (suggested price $17.50) then people will sign up to my newsletter list – which carries my blog posts, event lists and other news.

Test: Blog it, Tweet it, etc., wait a month and count the subscribers.

Use the form below and check your mailbox for confirmation and links.

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The post Xanpan – free eBook now! appeared first on Allan Kelly Associates.

Programmer’s Rorschach test

The picture above, I recently added this picture to Continuous Digital for a discussion of teams. When you look at it what do you see:

An old style structure chart, or an organization chart?

It could be either and anyone who knows of Conway’s Law shouldn’t be surprised.

When I was taught Modula-2 at college these sort of structure charts were considered superior to the older flow charts. This is functional decomposition, take a problem, break it down to smaller parts and implement them.

And that is the same idea behind traditional hierarchical organizational structure. An executive heads a division, he has a number of managers under him who manage work, each one of these manage several people who actually do the work (or perhaps manage more manager who manage the people who do the work!)

Most organizations are still set up this way. It is probably unsurprising that 50 years ago computer programmers copied this model when designing their systems – Conway’s Law, the system is a copy of the organization.

Fast forward to today, we use object oriented languages and design but most of our organizations are still constrained by hierarchical structure, that creates a conflict. The company is structurally decomposed but our code is object oriented.

The result is conflict and in many cases the organization wins – who hasn’t seen an object oriented system that is designed in layers?

While the conflict exists both system and organization under perform because time and energy are spent living the conflict, managing the conflict, overcoming the conflict.

What would the object-oriented company look like?

If we accept that object oriented design and programming are superior to procedural programming (and in general I do although I miss Modula-2) then it becomes necessary to change the organization to match the software design – reverse Conway’s Law or Yawnoc. That means we need teams which look and behave like objects:

  • Teams are highly cohesive (staffed with various skills) and lightly coupled (dependencies are minimised and the team take responsibility)
  • Teams are responsible for a discrete part of the system end-to-end
  • Teams add value in their own right
  • Teams are free to vary organizational implementation behind well defined interface
  • Teams are tested, debugged and maintained: they have been through the storming phase, are now performing and are kept together

There are probably some more attributes I could add here, please make your own suggestions in the comments below.

To regular readers this should all sound familiar, I’ve been exposing these ideas for a while, they draw on software design and Amoeba management, I discuss them at greater length Xanpan, The Xanpan Appendix and now Continuous Digital – actually, Continuous Digital directly updates some chapters from the Appendix.

And like so many programmers have found over the years, classes which are named “Manager” are more than likely poorly named and poorly designed. Manager is a catch all name, the class might well be doing something very useful but it can be named better. If it isn’t doing anything useful, then maybe it should be refactored into something that is. Most likely the ManagerClass is doing a lot of useful stuff but it is far from clear that it all belongs together. (See the management mini-series.)

Sometimes managers or manager classes  make sense, however both deserve closer examination. Are they vestige from the hierarchal world? Do they perform specialist functions which could be packaged and named better? Perhaps they are necessary, perhaps they are necessary for smoothing the conflict between the hierarchal organization and object oriented world.

Transaction costs can explain both managers and manager classes. There are various tasks which require knowledge of other tasks, or access to the same data. It is cheaper, and perhaps simpler, to put these diverse things together rather than pay the cost of spreading access out.

Of course if you accept the symbiosis of organization and code design then one should ask: what should the organization look like when the code is functional? What does the Lisp, Clojure or F# organization look like?

And, for that matter, what does the organization look like when you program in Prolog? What does a declarative organization look like?

Finally, I was about to ask about SQL, what does the relational organization look like, but I think you’ve already guessed the answer to this one: a matrix, probably a dysfunctional matrix.

The post Programmer’s Rorschach test appeared first on Allan Kelly Associates.

Exciting: Something different for those Leading & Managing Agile

“Some readers have found it curious that The Mythical Man Month devotes most of the essays to the managerial aspects of software engineering, rather than the many technical issues. This bias … sprang from [my] conviction that the quality of the people on a project, and their organization and management, are much more important factors in the success than are the tools they use or the technical approaches they take.” Frederick P. Brooks, The Mythical Man Month – Anniversary Edition (1995a, p.276)

This is one of my favourite quotes about software development.

Those of you who followed my management mini-series last year might remember some of my conclusions, specifically:

  • Management is still needed in most software teams
  • Even if you don’t have dedicated managers there is still management work to do; and without dedicated management that management work gets spread around so in a self-organizing team more people need to do management work

I can’t remember if I said it in that series or in another post: the quality of management in software development is often poor.

So now I’m going to do something about it.

Part of the problem is that very very few software engineers ever take time to learn about management. Sure they learn about Java, BDD, AWS, CSS etc. etc. but most people learn “managing” by watching the people who had the job before them. Unfortunately that tends to propagate poor management.

Why don’t people take the time to learn management skills the way they do technical skills?

A few days in the classroom learning about Java is great, why not spend a little time learning about management?

Now most readers probably know that I provide training, usually agile training to teams, but I have long felt that simply offering a two day training course for current and future managers wouldn’t be enough. I’ve long dreamt of offering a course that ran over a series of weeks, that allowed people to mix classroom learning and discussion of topics with hands on practice and, perhaps more importantly, reflection and group discussion.

Now I’m partnering up with Learning Connexions to offer just this course – I’m more excited about this than anything I have been in a while!

It’s going to run this autumn, September to December, half a day every two weeks.

In each session I’ll present some material but more importantly we’ll have discussions between people doing work. We’ll try and apply the material to real work. I expect group discussions will go beyond the stated subjects and allow everyone – me included! – to learn from one another.

Not only is this a new course it is a new way of approaching learning in work. Since it is new the course we are going to keep the price down. We’re running it on Friday afternoons so hopefully it won’t interfere with the usual work week too much.

Here are the hypothesis I’m testing:

  • Software development can be improved if software management can be improved: current software managers, aspiring software managers and software engineers will all do a better job if they take time to pro-actively learn about key issues in the software industry.
  • People will learn more and deeper if it is organised as a little and often.
  • Encouraging self reflection and group discussion about topics and real life problems will enhance learning.

The hypothesis you would be testing by coming along are:

  • I will learn more by discussing key topics with a cross section of my peers
  • An investment of six-half says and a little less than £1000 will pay back in increased effectiveness, productivity, organization, focus….

More information on the workshops on the training pages. (Yes, this is the new website.)

I hope, I very much hope we can make this work…. – please get over to Learning Connexions and book Leading & Managing Agile today. Even if you cannot attend I’d love to know your thoughts on this, please give me feedback – comment here or mail me direct, allan@allankelly.net.

And apologies, I’m going to be talking more about this in the next few weeks as I put material together and get more and more excited!

The post Exciting: Something different for those Leading & Managing Agile appeared first on Allan Kelly Associates.

Exciting: Something different for those Leading & Managing Agile

HeadacheiStock_000014496990SmallLeft-2017-07-20-10-29.jpg

“Some readers have found it curious that The Mythical Man Month devotes most of the essays to the managerial aspects of software engineering, rather than the many technical issues. This bias … sprang from [my] conviction that the quality of the people on a project, and their organization and management, are much more important factors in the success than are the tools they use or the technical approaches they take.” Frederick P. Brooks, The Mythical Man Month – Anniversary Edition (1995a, p.276)

This is one of my favourite quotes about software development.

Those of you who followed my management mini-series last year might remember some of my conclusions, specifically:

  • Management is still needed in most software teams
  • Even if you don’t have dedicated managers there is still management work to do; and without dedicated management that management work gets spread around so in a self-organizing team more people need to do management work

I can’t remember if I said it in that series or in another post: the quality of management in software development is often poor.

So now I’m going to do something about it.

Part of the problem is that very very few software engineers ever take time to learn about management. Sure they learn about Java, BDD, AWS, CSS etc. etc. but most people learn “managing” by watching the people who had the job before them. Unfortunately that tends to propagate poor management.

Why don’t people take the time to learn management skills the way they do technical skills?

A few days in the classroom learning about Java is great, why not spend a little time learning about management?

Now most readers probably know that I provide training, usually agile training to teams, but I have long felt that simply offering a two day training course for current and future managers wouldn’t be enough. I’ve long dreamt of offering a course that ran over a series of weeks, that allowed people to mix classroom learning and discussion of topics with hands on practice and, perhaps more importantly, reflection and group discussion.

Now I’m partnering up with Learning Connexions to offer just this course – I’m more excited about this than anything I have been in a while!

It’s going to run this autumn, September to December, half a day every two weeks.

In each session I’ll present some material but more importantly we’ll have discussions between people doing work. We’ll try and apply the material to real work. I expect group discussions will go beyond the stated subjects and allow everyone – me included! – to learn from one another.

Not only is this a new course it is a new way of approaching learning in work. Since it is new the course we are going to keep the price down. We’re running it on Friday afternoons so hopefully it won’t interfere with the usual work week too much.

Here are the hypothesis I’m testing:

  • Software development can be improved if software management can be improved: current software managers, aspiring software managers and software engineers will all do a better job if they take time to pro-actively learn about key issues in the software industry.
  • People will learn more and deeper if it is organised as a little and often.
  • Encouraging self reflection and group discussion about topics and real life problems will enhance learning.

The hypothesis you would be testing by coming along are:

  • I will learn more by discussing key topics with a cross section of my peers
  • An investment of six-half says and a little less than £1000 will pay back in increased effectiveness, productivity, organization, focus….

I hope, I very much hope we can make this work…. – please get over to Learning Connexions and book Leading & Managing Agile today. Even if you cannot attend I’d love to know your thoughts on this, please give me feedback – comment here or mail me direct, allan@allankelly.net.

And apologies, I’m going to be talking more about this in the next few weeks as I put material together and get more and more excited!

The post Exciting: Something different for those Leading & Managing Agile appeared first on Allan Kelly Associates.

Exciting: Something different for those Leading & Managing Agile

HeadacheiStock_000014496990SmallLeft-2017-07-20-10-29.jpg

“Some readers have found it curious that The Mythical Man Month devotes most of the essays to the managerial aspects of software engineering, rather than the many technical issues. This bias … sprang from [my] conviction that the quality of the people on a project, and their organization and management, are much more important factors in the success than are the tools they use or the technical approaches they take.” Frederick P. Brooks, The Mythical Man Month – Anniversary Edition (1995a, p.276)

This is one of my favourite quotes about software development.

Those of you who followed my management mini-series last year might remember some of my conclusions, specifically:

  • Management is still needed in most software teams
  • Even if you don’t have dedicated managers there is still management work to do; and without dedicated management that management work gets spread around so in a self-organizing team more people need to do management work

I can’t remember if I said it in that series or in another post: the quality of management in software development is often poor.

So now I’m going to do something about it.

Part of the problem is that very very few software engineers ever take time to learn about management. Sure they learn about Java, BDD, AWS, CSS etc. etc. but most people learn “managing” by watching the people who had the job before them. Unfortunately that tends to propagate poor management.

Why don’t people take the time to learn management skills the way they do technical skills?

A few days in the classroom learning about Java is great, why not spend a little time learning about management?

Now most readers probably know that I provide training, usually agile training to teams, but I have long felt that simply offering a two day training course for current and future managers wouldn’t be enough. I’ve long dreamt of offering a course that ran over a series of weeks, that allowed people to mix classroom learning and discussion of topics with hands on practice and, perhaps more importantly, reflection and group discussion.

Now I’m partnering up with Learning Connexions to offer just this course – I’m more excited about this than anything I have been in a while!

It’s going to run this autumn, September to December, half a day every two weeks.

In each session I’ll present some material but more importantly we’ll have discussions between people doing work. We’ll try and apply the material to real work. I expect group discussions will go beyond the stated subjects and allow everyone – me included! – to learn from one another.

Not only is this a new course it is a new way of approaching learning in work. Since it is new the course we are going to keep the price down. We’re running it on Friday afternoons so hopefully it won’t interfere with the usual work week too much.

Here are the hypothesis I’m testing:

  • Software development can be improved if software management can be improved: current software managers, aspiring software managers and software engineers will all do a better job if they take time to pro-actively learn about key issues in the software industry.
  • People will learn more and deeper if it is organised as a little and often.
  • Encouraging self reflection and group discussion about topics and real life problems will enhance learning.

The hypothesis you would be testing by coming along are:

  • I will learn more by discussing key topics with a cross section of my peers
  • An investment of six-half says and a little less than £1000 will pay back in increased effectiveness, productivity, organization, focus….

I hope, I very much hope we can make this work…. – please get over to Learning Connexions and book Leading & Managing Agile today. Even if you cannot attend I’d love to know your thoughts on this, please give me feedback – comment here or mail me direct, allan@allankelly.net.

And apologies, I’m going to be talking more about this in the next few weeks as I put material together and get more and more excited!

The post Exciting: Something different for those Leading & Managing Agile appeared first on Allan Kelly Associates.

A new blog home

After over 10 years blogging on Blogger I’m moving.

Actually, for the last 10 years I’ve been running three websites. The blog, AllanKelly.net and my company, commercial, site, SoftwareStrategy.co.uk. This kind of made sense once upon a time but it has increasingly meant that all three sites were a little neglected.

My plan is to merge all three sites into this one eventually. Hopefully that will also benefit my Google rankings but, it also means I need to keep all those inbound links!

This is going to be a gradual process…

The post A new blog home appeared first on Allan Kelly Associates.