Improving my vimrc live on stream

I was becoming increasingly uncomfortable with how crufty my neovim config was getting, and especially how I didn’t understand parts of it, so I decided to wipe it clean and rebuild it from scratch.

I did it live on stream, to make it feel like a worthwhile activity:

Headline features of the new vimrc:

  • A new theme, using the base16 theme framework
  • A file browser (NERDTree)
  • A minimalist status line with vim-airline
  • Search with ripgrep
  • Rust language support with Coc

Note: after the stream I managed to resolve the remaining issues with highlight colours not showing by triggering re-applying them after the theme has been applied:

augroup tabs_in_make
    autocmd!
    autocmd ColorScheme * highlight MatchParen cterm=none ctermbg=none ctermfg=green
augroup END

You can find my current neovim config at gitlab.com/andybalaam/configs/-/tree/main/.config/nvim.

Comparison of Matrix events before and after “Extensible Events”

[Updated 2022-11-17 based on the new draft of the MSC, notably removing backwards compatibility and the abbreviated forms.]

(Background: Matrix is the awesome open standard for messaging that I get to work on now that I work at Element.)

The Extensible Events (MSC1767) Matrix Spec Change proposal describes a new way of structuring events in matrix that makes it easy to send events that have multiple representations (e.g. something clever like an interactive map, and something simpler like an image of a map).

The change has 2 main purposes:

  1. To make it easy for clients that don’t support some amazing new feature to display something that is still useful.
  2. To allow re-using the definitions of parts of events in other events.

Since there is an implementation of this change out in the wild (in Element), it seems reasonably likely that this change will be accepted into the Matrix spec.

I really like this change, but I find it hard to understand, so here is a simple example that I have found helpful to think it through.

An old event, and a new event

Here is an old-fashioned event, followed by a new, shiny, extensible version:

{
    "type": "m.room.message",
    "content": {
        "body": "This is the *old* way",
        "format": "org.matrix.custom.html",
        "formatted_body": "This is the <b>old</b> way",
        "msgtype": "m.text"
    },
    ... other properties not relevant to this, e.g. "sender" ...
}
{
    "type": "m.message",
    "content": {
        "m.markup": [
            {"mimetype": "text/plain", "body": "This the *new* way"},
            {"mimetype": "text/html", "body": "This is the <b>new</b> way"}
        ],
    }
    ... other properties not relevant to this, e.g. "sender" ...
}

The point is that as well as normal contents of the message (here, the m.markup “content block”) we can have other representations of the same message, such as an image, location co-ordinates, or something completely different. The client will render using the content blocks it expects if it knows about this event type (and is able to show it), but if not, it can look for other content blocks that it does understand.

For example, in Polls when you send a new poll question, it could look like this:

{
    "type": "m.poll.start",
    "content": {
        "m.poll": {
            ... The actual poll question etc. ...
        },
        "m.markup": [
            ... A text version of the question ...
        ]
    },
    ... other properties not relevant to this, e.g. "sender" ...
}

So clients that don’t know m.poll.start can still display the poll question (if they understand extensible events), instead of completely ignoring event types they don’t know about.

Notice that sometimes content blocks (inside content) can have the same name as the event type, but they don’t have to.

Streaming to Twitch and PeerTube simultaneously using nginx on Oracle cloud

Simulcasting RTMP using NGINX

I want people to be able to watch my Matrix and Rust live coding streams using free software, so I’d like to simulcast to PeerTube as well as Twitch.

This is possible using NGINX and its RTMP module. It does involve building NGINX from source, but I actually found that reasonably easy to do.

Why Oracle cloud?

I would never recommend using Oracle for anything, but they do provide up to two virtual machines in their cloud for free, and the one I am using has been consistently available with very good connectivity, in a London data centre since I set it up several months ago.

So, we are making our lives more difficult by trying to do this on Oracle Linux, which is a derivative of RHEL.

Building NGINX and its RTMP module on Oracle Linux

I ran these commands on my Oracle cloud instance (running Oracle Linux):

sudo yum install git pcre-devel openssl-devel
mkdir nginx
cd nginx
wget http://nginx.org/download/nginx-1.21.4.tar.gz
git clone https://github.com/arut/nginx-rtmp-module.git
cd nginx-1.21.4
./configure --add-module=../nginx-rtmp-module/
make
sudo make install

After all this NGINX was installed to /usr/local/nginx/.

Creating the NGINX config file for RTMP simulcasting

Next I edited the NGINX config file by typing:

sudo nano /usr/local/nginx/conf/nginx.conf

And pasted in this config at the bottom of the file:

rtmp {
    server {
        listen 2036;
        chunk_size 4096;
        application live {
            live on;
            record off;
            push rtmp://live.twitch.tv/app/live_INSERT_TWITCH_STREAM_KEY;
            push rtmp://diode.zone/live/INSERT_PEERTUBE_STREAM_KEY;
        }
    }
}

Notice that you will need to get your Twitch stream key from Twitch -> Creator Dashboard -> Settings -> Stream, then Copy next to the Primary Stream Key.

To get a PeerTube stream ID, you will need to go to your PeerTube page and click Publish, then Go Live, choose your channel and choose Go Live. Note that if you want the streams to record and be available later, you have to create a new stream key each time you start a stream, and change it in nginx.conf.

If you use a different PeerTube server (I use diode.zone) then you’ll need to change the server name in the config file above too.

Make sure your config file is saved with the right URLs in it.

Opening ports

To send RTMP traffic to my server, I needed to open the right port to the Oracle cloud instance. That involved creating an ingress rule, and adding a firewall rule.

Creating an ingress rule

In the web interface, I went to the menu in the top left, clicked Compute, then Instances.

I clicked on my instance’s name, then I clicked on the name of the subnet in the details (on the right).

I clicked on Default security list for…, then Add Ingress Rules.

I made an ingress rule with Source Type=CIDR, Source CIDR=0.0.0.0/0, IP Protocol=TCP, Source Port Range=(blank, meaning all), Destination Port Range=2036

Adding a firewall rule

Then I ssh’d into the machine and ran these commands to create a firewall rule allowing the traffic:

sudo firewall-cmd --zone=public --permanent --add-port=2036/tcp
sudo firewall-cmd --reload

Stop and Start NGINX

After creating the config file and opening the right port, I needed to start NGINX.

Every time I change the config file, I need to restart it.

If it’s already running, I stop it with:

sudo /usr/local/nginx/sbin/nginx -s stop

and then I start it up again with

sudo /usr/local/nginx/sbin/nginx

I can check whether it’s happy by looking at the log files, for example to see any errors:

less /usr/local/nginx/logs/error.log

Starting the stream

Now I go into OBS and go to File -> Settings -> Stream and choose the type as Custom, and the Server as rtmp://1.1.1.1:2036/live. (But instead of 1.1.1.1 I put the public IP address of my instance, which I found by clicking the name of the instance in the Oracle cloud management console.)

New game: Tron – frantic multiplayer retro action

My newest game is out now on Smolpxl Games – Tron:

Pixellated lines fight each other to stay alive

Play at smolpxl.gitlab.io/tron.

It’s a frantic multiplayer retro pixellated thingy playable in your browser. Try to stay alive longer than everyone else!

This version allows many players (up to 16 if you can manage it), and is quite pure in its implementation.

There are bots to play against, and you can gather your friends around a keyboard to play together.

Part of the motivation for writing this game was to test my new smolpxl-remote remote-play system, but this is not enabled yet, so watch this space…

I love playing games with other people – preferably at least 3 other people. In theory you could have 8 players around a keyboard playing this – send me a picture if you try!

One feature I worked on in the Smolpxl library for this game: saving configuration to local storage (and asking permission to do so). I ended up with a very ugly hack to do this, so a bit more work is needed before I merge it into the library.

Preventing Virgin Media hijacking my DNS

Yesterday I learned that Virgin Media is inserting itself into some of my DNS requests. Much as I am not a fan of how powerful Cloudflare are, if they are telling the truth about their DNS, then it’s safe, so I followed their instructions on how to use their DNS and then removed the default DNS and hopefully my Internet will work now.

From the serverfault answer by lauc.exon.nod:

nmcli con mod "Wired connection 1" ipv4.dns "1.1.1.1 1.0.0.1"
nmcli con mod "Wired connection 1" ipv4.ignore-auto-dns yes
nmcli con down "Wired connection 1"
nmcli con up "Wired connection 1"